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Posts Tagged ‘human experimentation’

rcooknano

I am fascinated with the world of nanotechnology. The concept of making robots so small on a molecular level that could (one day) swim around your blood stream eating cancers and tumors or even used to generate organs from a vat of organic chemicals … fascinates me immensely. So when I saw the Nano by Robin Cook, it was literary Christmas times two (yes, I need to get out more).

Interestingly enough, Pia Grazdani returns. You, know the chick from Death Benefits (just a few posts down, mates) with the scary baggage. After surviving some “stuff” (sorry but I don’t intend to ruin it for those that haven’t read Benefits as yet) in NYC, she takes some time away from her studies and finds herself in the employ of Nano; a company that is doing pioneering research in the field of nanotechnology and headed by the charismatic, driven Zachary Berman. Nestled at the foothills of the Rockies (in Colorado), with a magnificent campus, Nano is a seemingly Pia’s ideal workplace. Did I that, somehow, Mr. Berman has somewhat tapped into unknown source of “unlimited funding”? Well, I guess I just did. During a jog through the sprawling campus, Pia encounters a fallen “employee” that has seemingly succumbed to a severe seizure. When the man suddenly recovers from (let’s just say … um … ) death and then whisked away from hospital by special Nano staff to a highly restricted area of the Nano campus, a sea of red flags are raised in Pia’s mind about the situation. As Pia struggles to unearth the secrets of Nano, she discovery reveals a Pandora’s box of vileness that shatters the scientific utopia of Nano: human experiments. And yes, there is no such thing as “unlimited funding” and if there is … be careful of the hosts for they want something even more. To make things worse, Mr. Berman has plans for Ms. Grazdani that have more to do with silk and satin sheets and other bits of naughtiness rather than late night discussions of the latest techniques of molecular production.
As Pia is drawn to the terrifying truth, we find more twists than a DNA helix where everyone aren’t what they seem and the limits that some are willing to go for the sake of profitable medical technologies … even if it involves murder.

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