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Posts Tagged ‘opiods’

Once in a while, I like to do crazy things like reading books about stuff that’ll probably give sleepless nights or in the case of Mr. Cook … make me paranoid of ever setting foot in another hospital. So naturally when I came across Robin Cook’s new book, my inner masochist simply threw caution to the wind and said … bloody hell, why not. Of course this is most likely the book that most folks may want to read as this country struggles through the Coronavirus crisis. Fear not, though a medical thriller it has very little to do with pandemics, and yes, I try not to be a complete and insensitive tosser. But enough of the blah-blah and other pleasantries and let’s get on with the blooming review. Yeah?
When twenty-eight-year old social worker, Kera Jacobsen, shows up on the autopsy table at NYC’s Office of City Medical Examiner (OCME) it seems like a typical overdose. Another tragic victim of the opioid crisis. But for ME Laurie Montgomery and her brilliant and enigmatic pathology resident, Dr. Aria Nichols, things are a wee bit off since Kera was never known, by most, to abuse drugs and it was discovered during the autopsy that Kera was ten weeks pregnant. To make things even more interesting, when Kera’s friend (and fellow social worker), Miranda, collaborates with Aria and suggest the use of genealogical DNA databases to track down the mysterious father of the child, things really take an interesting turn … and the shit hits the fan (Miranda is murdered). And so a strange game of cat-and-mouse begins.
Aria is an interesting character (to say the least): a potential forensic prodigy that constantly defy resident protocols, a possible sociopath, and has an aversion to anything male and bearing a penis.But what she lacks in social graces, emotions or following rules she makes up for quite skillfully in forensic investigations and autopsies. On the other hand ME Laurie Montgomery aside from being an astute and consummate professional has to deal with Aria as a subordinate, and then there is the fact that she has a ticking time bomb inside her (she’s diagnosed with the BRCA1 gene mutations) and two children that are on the autistic spectrum. Her husband James is also a skilled medical examiner AND her subordinate. Yes, awkward pillow talk and such bollocks but he is seemingly the one thing that balances out the seeming and impending chaos that exist in her life. But paths will intersect as the search for this mysterious man continues in dizzying speed, and somewhere in the midst of the medical labyrinth there is some willing to kill, with undetectable efficiency, to make sure that truth never comes to light. And everything hurtles towards a breathtaking conclusion that may leave some folks with soiled undies … and a reasonable fear of medical institutions.
In a world where genealogical databases offer so much insight to people’s past, Genesis shows the other side of this medical Pandora box offering. In truth, in several cases genealogical databases haven been used to solve unsolved murder cases. Cook, in typical fashion, offers up a thrilling read and cautionary tale into the world of genealogical databases: it may be help you learn about the past … and even the present … in, some cases, very gory details. Use with caution. And enjoy the read.

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